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Monthly Archives: November 2016

Career of Arts Education

An Arts Education Coordinator works full or part-time in an art institution such as an art gallery, art museum, or experimental art center.

The main objective of working as an Arts Education Coordinator is to coordinate and assist with educational programs and interactive encounters between visitors and the art and artists.

Education Needed to Be an Arts Education Coordinator

To be hired as an Arts Education Coordinator, it is typically required to have a Bachelor’s degree with having studied subjects such as art, communications, education and marketing.

Duties Required to Be an Arts Education Coordinator

An Arts Education Coordinator acts as the institution’s advocate and administrator to the art institution’s staff, by supporting exhibitions and events, educational outreach and community programs, and working with the wide range of the art institution’s visitors of all age groups.

The administrative Arts Education Coordinator focuses on specific areas pertaining to the operation of various programs, and includes promoting activities and events, scheduling, and maintaining the various gallery spaces.

An Arts Education Coordinator works closely with the art institution’s departments such as: Collections, Education, Exhibition, Marketing and Visitor Services, and also with artists and the community.

An Arts Education Coordinator helps make art accessible to visitors and helps to make visitors feel welcome when exposed to new art and ideas for the first time. As a result, having a friendly and accepting attitude to visitors is extremely important, as guiding and introducing visitors to interactive artworks and providing them with a positive experience is key.

In addition to guiding the audience, an Arts Education Coordinator manages visitor flow, and safety rules and policies, and makes sure the necessary supplies are stocked in the gallery for visitor usage.

Maintenance logistics is part of the job and includes taking care of the lighting, repairs, cleaning and set-up, volunteers and staff. Coordinating all the schedules of staff, volunteers, and interns, the Coordinator may also be in charge of the main calendar for all events and programs.

An Arts Education Coordinator is in charge of the marketing and updates the website, calendar listings, promotional materials, and social media. Analyzing and collecting data in order to update databases, document statistics, attendance, and budgets is a big part of the job.

Skills Required to Be an Arts Education Coordinator

Besides being highly organized and a multi-tasker, an Arts Education Coordinator speaks and writes well and has good technological and computer skills. Other skills include a strong knowledge of museums and marketing, and how to work with diverse groups of visitors ranging from small children to adults.

Career Opportunities for Arts Education Coordinators

There are jobs in museums available for Arts Education Coordinators. According to the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics, overall employment of museum staff is “projected to grow 11 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations.”

The Bureau does not post specific statistics for Museum Rentals Manager jobs, but the available managerial jobs would just be a small portion of the amount the BLS posts on their site.

Everybody Knows … Elizabeth Murray

While she achieved a good deal of recognition in her lifetime, Elizabeth Murray, the subject of this fine yet too-short documentary, remains an American artist who hasn’t quite gotten her due. One hopes “Everybody Knows … Elizabeth Murray” changes that at least a little.

This cogent, fascinating portrait of the artist, who died in 2007 at 66, was made over several years by Kristi Zea, best known for her work as a production designer on notable films directed by Martin Scorsese and Jonathan Demme (among them “Goodfellas” and “The Silence of the Lambs”). The movie shows the great variety of Murray’s always vivid, colorful work, and culminates with a triumph not just for Murray but also, as the film takes pains to point out, for women in American art: a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. (An exhibition of her work is at the gallery Canada through Jan. 29.)

Murray comes across as personable, friendly, extremely thoughtful and wholly admirable. The movie, perhaps without intending to, demonstrates that one needn’t be a prickly person to be a wonderful artist. Meryl Streep, reading from Murray’s journals, does well communicating her emotional and intellectual acuity. While remaining upbeat about the artist’s legacy, “Everybody Knows” is underscored by a sense of just how much the art world lost when Murray left it.

This brief feature is accompanied at Film Forum by a 30-minute short,“The 100 Years Show,” a lively look at the Cuban-born artist Carmen Herrera, an art-world “discovery” as she approached her centenary. Now 101, she finally received a solo exhibition at a major New York museum (the Whitney Museum of American Art) last year.

Deadpool on List of Nominess

La La Land,” “Manchester by the Sea” and “Moonlight,” three films that have been pulling in top honors all awards season, were among the Producers Guild Award nominees announced Tuesday. The list of 10 also included “Deadpool,” which was a huge hit at the box office but not so much among prize-givers.

Contending for the Darryl F. Zanuck Award, the producers’ equivalent of best picture, are:

“Arrival”

“Deadpool”

“Fences”

“Hacksaw Ridge”

“Hell or High Water”

“Hidden Figures”

“La La Land”

“Lion”

“Manchester by the Sea”

“Moonlight”

The Producers Guild also revealed its animation nominees on Tuesday: “Finding Dory,” “Kubo and the Two Strings,” “Moana,” “The Secret Life of Pets” and “Zootopia,” which won the Golden Globe on Sunday.

The guild had previously announced its best documentary nominees: “Dancer,” “The Eagle Huntress,” “Life, Animated,” “O.J.: Made in America” and “Tower.” All except “Dancer” are on the shortlist for the Oscar for best documentary feature.

The PGAs have a strong track record of picking a feature winner that goes on to take the best-picture Oscar as well. That was the case from 2007 through 2014, more or less. In 2013 there was a tie but one of the guild’s winners, “12 Years a Slave,” did win the Oscar. Last year, though, the producers crowned “The Big Short,” while “Spotlight” nabbed the Oscar.

So if you’re hoping the PGAs will provide insight into the Oscars, you might want to wait until the guilds’ winners are clear. The PGA Awards ceremony will be held on Jan. 28. The next night will be the Screen Actors Guild Awards (nominees were announced last month). Then on Feb. 4 comes the Directors Guild, which will reveal its nominees later this week.ness

The Deco Dreams of Brazil’s

Some Brazilians write off Goiânia, far from São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, as their version of Midwestern flyover country. But farming and ranching generates much of the country’s wealth and influences Brazilian culture these days, even if the region sometimes neglects its own complex and sophisticated history.

Goiânia’s creators envisioned the city as an outpost of civilization preceding the so-called March to the West that began in 1940 and prioritized the colonization of Brazil’s vast interior. Brasília, the futuristic federal capital inaugurated in 1960, was perhaps the ultimate example of this push.

As envisaged by the pioneering architect Attílio Corrêa Lima, Goiânia seems to have had a more inviting feel than Brasília’s austere modernism. Here’s the same gazebo in the early 1940s, back when Goiânia was planned for just 50,000 residents.

More than 1.4 million people now live in Goiânia, which is emerging as a bastion of the conservative views reshapingBrazilian politics. With its cavernous steakhouses and clubs featuring sertanejo universitário (Brazil’s version of upscale country music), Goiânia exemplifies the ranching aspirations of much of Brazil’s heartland.

Some landmarks persist, albeit in graffiti-splattered disrepair, like the Grande Hotel.

The French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss stayed in the hotel in 1937, describing it as “a square box of cement, with the look of an air terminus or a miniature fort; one might have called it a bastion of civilization.”

In his celebrated work, “Tristes Tropiques,” Lévi-Strauss wondered why Brazil’s leaders were “grabbing at the desert” to build the city instead of hewing to the charming old state capitol, Goiás Velho, founded in 1727.

What might he make now of Goiânia, with developers laying waste to Art Deco buildings, replacing them with the nondescript high-rises that occupy cities around Brazil?

In the shadow of those towers in Goiânia, I glimpsed how Brazil is shifting. For inspiration Brazilians once looked to France, the cradle of Art Deco. But while walking around Goiânia, I came across establishments like the China Construction Bank, reflecting the trade ties connecting Brazil’s farm belt to the global economy.

On the same street, patrons flowed into the flashy Detroit Steakhouse. The eatery didn’t seem to be striving for associations with the American city known for blight (and, yes,resurgence), but rather the positive, can-do vibe that the United States still holds for many people in Midwestern Brazil.

Still, I couldn’t help but wonder what Goiânia would look like if it had preserved more of its earliest architectural creations. Might it have resembled Asmara, the capital of closed-off Eritrea in the Horn of Africa, known for its well-preserved Art Deco treasures built by Italian occupiers in the 1930s? Or like a Miami Beach on the savannas of Brazil?

Either way, Goiânia, only about 80 years old, is still clutching for some history. The main plaza downtown is named officially for Mr. Corrêa Lima, the architect. But most people call it the Praça do Bandeirante, after the São Paulo explorers who went into the back country on slave-hunting missions.

Brazil was searching for myths in 1942 when the authorities unveiled the statue of Bartolomeu Bueno da Silva, an 18th-century bandeirante. To this day he is better known as Anhangüera, “Old Devil” in the Tupi indigenous language, a name evoking the brutal methods conquerors used to take possession of the lands on which Goiânia was built.